The coronavirus has been a thorn in the side of the entire world for over a year now. And while some regions have shown significant improvement, others still have a way to go. When properly implemented, such precautions as mask-wearing and social distancing can prevent further spread of the virus, but they can’t completely eradicate or control the disease. The only true way to do that is to receive the newly developed COVID-19 vaccine.

In a word, yes–the coronavirus vaccine is safe. Unfortunately, while many have been eagerly awaiting the arrival of the COVID-19 vaccine, misinformation and confusion have left many more people wary of the shot. Is the vaccine safe? Does getting it place you at just as much risk as getting infected naturally? Let’s look at the facts.

The coronavirus vaccine is available! Misinformation about its safety and efficacy abound, but there’s no need to be confused. Here’s what the facts say. #MainStreetMedical #MainStreetClinics #coronavirus #COVID19 #vaccines Click To Tweet

Vaccine Safety Standards

Every vaccine has been rigorously tested for safety. While the COVID-19 vaccine arrived on the scene very quickly, it has also been through extensive testing before its release to the public. Test subjects, whether they received the actual vaccine or a placebo, were closely monitored for adverse side effects. The speed at which the vaccine became available may seem concerning to some. However, with the urgency of the situation in mind, the short timespan should be viewed as simply a consequence of the fact that scientists understood there was no time to waste.

It’s also important to note that neither available version of the coronavirus vaccine contains commonly-cited allergens, such as metals or eggs. This ensures that even those who have to forgo certain vaccines for genuine medical reasons can be protected from COVID-19.

Who Should Get the Coronavirus Vaccine?

Testing has shown the vaccine to be safe overall for the general population. However, certain groups are still undergoing testing. Very young children, pregnant mothers, and breastfeeding women have not been tested as extensively. This is entirely for their safety. Particularly high-risk groups generally get tested last since, if the vaccine did cause adverse side effects, the vulnerable population has far more to lose. The few tests that have been conducted on more vulnerable subjects show very promising results. If you or a loved one fall into the high-risk category, make sure to discuss the vaccine with your doctor.

Protect Yourself & Others

A combination of social distancing, wearing masks, washing your hands, and getting the vaccine will slow the spread of COVID-19 and eventually bring it to a much more manageable level. Getting the vaccine does more than just protect you. It also protects the most vulnerable among us.

Contact us for more information on the coronavirus vaccine and how you can get on the waiting list.

Dr Abbas Jafri MD